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adviceAs insurance brokers we are here to help! Part of that assistance is our expert advice that we provide. So we thought it would be a great idea to ask our employees, “What is one piece of advice you would give your clients?” 

 

Mark Bononi- Director, Luxury Yacht Division 

Generally speaking, you get what you pay for. Typically, health insurance that has a lower cost will not have the same amount of coverage as one that costs more. If you are looking for health insurance that fits you best but you have a budget, seek advice from someone who knows what they’re talking about, and is experienced on the matter. 

Edward “Mole” Telfer- Director, Cruise Division 

Providing a solid employee benefits package can be the key to attracting and retaining the industry’s best employees. Use a “Rolling Benefits Strategy” to build up your benefits over time. 

Janine Jeffries- Director, Business Insurance Division

Give your agent a complete picture of the business and description of operations. Each business has unique attributes. The more your broker knows, or has a better understanding, the better we can do our job. Also, be sure to ask questions. You would be surprised how many needs are uncovered during a Q&A session with your broker. 

Stephen Beck- Manager, Life & Health Division

I would advise our clients to not WORRY about “What if?” but to ASK about the cost of insuring themselves against each “What if?” that concerns them. Just ask, “How can I protect myself in the event of a ________________?” We have the answer. 

Joanna Drysdale- Manager, Underwriting Services 

In our field, insurance isn’t just about protecting yourself against financial loss or covering your contractual obligations. It’s also about showing your employees that they’re valuable to you. Hanging on to a great bunch of crew season after season is worth so much more than the savings you make by skimping on crew benefits.

JW Haagensen- Account Executive, Inside Sales 

Disclose all current and past medical conditions when applying for insurance. Insurance enrollment forms are a contract and if you fail to reveal a portion of your medical history or provide incomplete information, the insurance company could cancel your policy. No matter how minor it may seem, it’s important to advise your entire medical history and keep a file.

Steve Jackson- Consultant, Yacht Division

Find an insurance broker who really knows their field. Having an understanding of the real life of a captain and his crew as well as the technical knowledge of the insurance industry is invaluable. 

Clayton Swart- Manager, Business Development 

Whether you’re purchasing group insurance for your employees, insurance for your business or an individual plan for you and your family, it’s important to understand your policy. I know that insurance documents can be boring, but it’s really important that you read through them to make sure you understand the benefits and limitations of the plan. If you find anything confusing, it’s better to address those points before you need to use the plan.

MHG is here to help and provide assistance with all of your insurance needs. Whether you are looking for marine crew insurance, health insurance, life insurance, travel insurance, expatriate insurance or insurance for your business, we have the experience and knowledge to help you find the right policy. Please contact us at +1 954-828-1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com. Let our insurance specialists find you, your family, or group, the best insurance available for your budget.

If You Could Give One Piece of Advice to Your Clients, What Would It Be?

Miami International Boat ShowThe Miami international Boat Show is here, and the Palm Beach International Boat Show is just around the corner, which means one thing for yacht crew, BUSY! Boat Shows can be a fun way to mingle and network with your peers in the yachting industry, those who are looking to get into the yachting industry, and let’s not forget those that want to go just to see all the boats. However, it can be quite a busy time for yacht crew with all the events, parties, and functions to attend. And that’s after working all day. There are some things you should be aware of when attending a Boat Show, especially if you are visiting from out of town, which can slip your mind in the midst of everything going on. Here is our list of things to be aware of when visiting a boat show.


1. You May Lose Your Health Insurance If Your Boat Sells 

Boat Shows are a great time with, big parties, events, speakers, and networking. It’s easy to forget the purpose of the show, to sell boats! If you are a crew member of a boat that was sold, it is possible you will lose your health insurance. Be sure to know what the aspects of your insurance plan are, and talk to your captain about what happens if your boat does indeed sell. If you do lose your insurance, it’s not the end of the world, we can help you with that!

2. Temporary Floating Docks 

Temporary floating docks could potentially be a hazard for someone who isn’t experienced walking on them.  They do not offer the same support as a permanent, sturdy dock, and can also be very narrow, weaving in and out of boats like a maze. Someone can easily lose their balance and fall in the water. For those who do have experience walking on docks like these, it is important not to be complacent, and always use caution. 

3. Over Indulgence

It can be very easy to over indulge at a boat show, or any gathering for that matter. Especially after working hard all day and wanting to enjoy yourself at night. With people handing you drink after drink, having a good time with those around you, it can be very easy to lose track of how many you may have had. Being a little intoxicated, walking on floating docks, being in an unfamiliar place, can be a sure recipe for an accident. If you are planning to indulge and don’t want to get too intoxicated, try having a drink and following it with water. 

4. Knowing Your Surroundings 

People travel to boat shows from all over the world. Many of those people aren’t familiar with the location, which may cause some problems. For one, if you have an important meeting at the show, you wouldn’t want to get lost and be late or miss your meeting. Another reason it would behoove you to familiarize yourself with where you are, is in the event of an emergency. It’s always a good idea to know where the closest hospital or Urgent Care facility is located. 

5. Stress 

With everything that is going on at a boat show it can be quite easy to get stressed. There are so many events packed into one short weekend, and let’s not forget all the work to be done on the yacht. You can be overwhelmed quickly. So try to remember to enjoy yourself and have a good time, and remember you are at one of the coolest events in the world!

Don’t forget, the Miami International Boat Show starts February 12th and ends February 16th, and the Palm Beach International Boat Show is March 20th- 23rd

For more information on what’s currently happening with Yacht Crew Insurance, read our previous blog, What Does Cuba’s Opened Borders Mean for Your Insurance? If you are interested in purchasing Crew Insurance, or would just like to talk to us for more information or advice, please contact us at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com. MHG has the Insurance Specialists to get you, your family, or group, the best coverage for your budget.

5 Things to Be Aware of When at a Boat Show

Cuba¡Hola Cuba! It might be time to brush up on your Spanish now that border restrictions between the United States and Cuba have been loosened. For those that don’t know, recently there was a shift in policy by the President of the United States easing travel restrictions between the U.S. and Cuba, which may soon open a wealth of opportunity for the travel and tourism industry, especially since it’s only 90 miles south of Key West. Many U.S. based insurance companies will begin to pay for claims and reimbursements that they previously never used to.  Does anyone know how to say insurance in Spanish?! 

 

Cuban Coverage 

As you could assume, many Americans, and possibly yachts, will be looking to include Cuba as a destination to see the beaches and other sites, since that it has been off limits for the past 50+ years. With many expected to travel to Cuba, statistics show that accidents are bound to happen, so it is important to know if your insurance provides coverage. If so, any expenses should be covered under the standard term of the policy that you have. So you will have the same coverage in Cuba that you would anywhere. As long as you are visiting under “legal” methods, your policy should provide you with coverage, depending on the carrier. 

Coming Soon 

It is important that you continue to check with your insurance agent whether or not your policy has changed yet. We know of three carriers that have said they will honor claims made from Cuba, and can only assume that others will soon follow. So if your carrier doesn’t cover now, it may very well in the near future. Insurance carriers will also be working over the next couple months to create a doctor network, which will be very helpful to yacht crew and tourists alike. 

Health Concerns

Keep in mind, many Americans more than likely have never been to Cuba, so it would be smart to be prepared for different scenarios. There could be health concerns such as the chikungunya virus that is prevalent throughout the Caribbean. Also, in the event that you do fall ill or require medical attention, be sure to keep vigilant to prevent any fraud. Don’t fall victim to being overcharged. For example, if you are paying $3000 for a checkup, your insurance is not going to reimburse you for that. This is just a consumer beware, not a need for concern, and definitely not an accusation against the Cuban medical environment. 

Keep in mind that all of the changes that are forthcoming are new, and new information can present itself at any time. Be sure to check in regularly to stay aware of any updates. 

If you have any questions about your yacht crew insurance plan regarding Cuba, or are interested in purchasing travel insurance or expat insurance, please contact us at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com.  For more information on crew insurance, read our previous blog, "5 Things You Should Know About Crew Insurance." MHG has the insurance specialists to assist and advise you, your loved ones, group, or business, on all of your insurance needs.

What Does Cuba's Opened Borders Mean for Your Insurance?

MHG58At MHG Insurance Brokers, we make sure that our yacht crew clients are insured in the event of a medical issue or an accident, but we also take an interest in the everyday health and safety of our clients. Today we would like to provide a round up of information from our friends and partners that are experts on Yacht Safety Drills. If you have a story or comment about onboard safety drills, including ways to make a drill fun or memorable, please leave us a comment or join the discussion on our Facebook page. 

 

1. Make drills fun. 

A common discussion in yacht captain forums is how to run safety drills. As one commenter in YachtForums.com mentions, anything that breaks up the monotony of daily tasks is usually a welcome break, but making a safety drill fun and competitive will not only help get crew involved, but also makes it easier to recall the procedure under times of stress, when you really need it.

We have an annual contest to see who can get into their survival suit the fastest- you'd be surprised how fast those times are when there is an iPod or $100 (plus bragging rights) on the line for the winner.
To read this discussion in full, click here 

2. Spread the knowledge. 

Our second point is a reminder that all crew need strong safety skills, even those skills that may not usually fall under their responsibilities, and it comes from Dockwalk's article on Safety Drills.

Know your stuff. Throughout your yachting career you will receive varying levels of safety training from sea survival to first aid, but keeping these skills fresh could prove to be invaluable in an emergency. “Recently, I was running a drill during which the crew role play. [In this drill,] a lot of the crew had been seriously injured, including the boats medical officer,” says Capt. Nick. “Our allocated deputy [medical officer] had to step up to the mark. I asked her to talk me through the CPR procedure. It was fairly obvious that she had forgotten much of the basics and I realized that refresher courses should be part of our training schedule.”
To read this article in full on Dockwalk's webpage, click here. 

3. Consider the learning styles of your crew when going through drills. 

There are three types of learners: visual, auditory and kinesthetic. In other words, we all commit things to memory using sight, sound, or touch. In order to help all crew remember procedures, consider testing them in using each of these ways. For example, demonstrations will help visual learners, asking crew to repeat information will help an auditory learners and hands-on practice will aid kinesthetic learners. For more on learning styles, click here.  

4. Consider security drills as well as safety drills.

According to a recent article in The Triton by megayacht stew Alene Keenan, safety is just one important drill that should be considered part of crew responsibilities.

The importance of security training is finally being recognized and is now mandatory for all crew on ISPS-compliant yachts. Many young crew think the STCW code consists simply of the four modules of Basic Safety training required to get our first yacht job. Perhaps we don’t think about the relevance of security awareness training unless security issues touch us individually. For me, the relevance of this came about as a direct result of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. I was the new chief stew on a yacht based at Chelsea Piers on 23rd street. We saw it all happen. We were not able to move the vessel because our engines were disabled and so we ended up volunteering. Security drills are mandatory and best practices have been formulated to mitigate risks of a security breach. Ship security plans detail the procedures to follow in the event of an incident. But on that morning, we did not know what to do or what to expect.
To read Alene's article in full, click here. 

5. Take responsibility for yourself. 

Regulations and drills are one thing, but when it comes down to it, safety is everyone's responsibility. If you are a chef onboard and cannot tie a knot, you may come to regret not taking the time to learn basic seamen skills. No matter what position you are in, ask questions, grasp as much familiarity with the boat and the tasks that each mate manages, and consider the additional learning not only a resume builder, but a potential lifesaver.  

5 Things to Know about Yacht Safety Drills

MHG53When it comes to international yacht crew insurance, being as open and forthcoming as possible, both before and during the time you are insured, can be critical to having a successful insurance experience. When you ask people about their medical status, the most common response is “I’m fine”. Unfortunately many people often... shall we say... “overstate” how healthy they are.  Normally, this will not bode well once a claim against insurance is made. 

 

Let’s review the 5 most common pitfalls: 

1. Non-disclosure of a past medical condition

Not only can this be a dangerous situation for you and your fellow crew, but it also sets up a scenario where in a worst case, your insurance could be cancelled. Insurance enrollment forms are a contract, and misrepresentation or incomplete information can render your insurance policy void. It’s important, no matter how minor it may seem, to disclose your entire medical history (and keep a file).

2. Non-disclosure of an ongoing medical condition 

Accurately representing your health to the insurance company (and even your insurance broker) is really important. Many people don’t realize that taking a regular prescription drug is significant in the eyes of the insurer.  When the claims start coming in for the cost of those medications, the insurer is most certainly going to start asking questions and that’s likely to take you down the path of having your claims denied. With all of the necessary information, we can provide you with personalized support that works for you. 

3. Overstating the recovery of a previous illness or injury 

It’s important to be careful about saying, “I’m fine” after recovery from an illness or injury. This is particularly important with back, shoulder and neck injuries.  With the work that you do, we often see crew returning to work before they really should and that doesn’t always give the body time to fully recover. Not being in pain, may not mean you are fully recovered. 

4. Non-disclosure of all the facts at the time of claim

If you have an injury or illness and you need to make a claim, it is important to fill out the claim form completely with as much detail as possible surrounding the circumstances.  This may include an incident report, or possibly a police report(!) along with your own personal narrative, which can be valuable.  Withholding information usually will simply result in your claim being delayed or otherwise declined.

5. Waiting until you have insurance to see a doctor     

This is the most critical item of all the pitfalls, when it comes to your wellbeing.  Do not delay seeking medical attention until you have health insurance. Not only are you putting your health at risk, but once you do see the doctor, the insurance company will probably not pay your claim because you had the condition prior to purchasing insurance. This is a standard clause in most international insurance plans, the language says something to the effect that treatment should have been sought previously by a prudent person. So please be prudent! The key to a successful insurance experience starts from the very beginning and goes all the way until you are no longer in need of health insurance. 

The MHG team looks forward to seeing you at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show and will be on hand to answer all of your questions about yacht crew insurance, US health insurance, sick pay / disability income, life insurance and travel insurance. See you at booth 727B located in the USSA Pavilion located in the Yachting Tent! If you’re not attending the show and are still interested in learning more about the different types of insurance that we offer, please call MHG Insurance Brokers at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com to find the insurance plan that perfectly meets your needs.  

Yacht Crew Insurance: Putting All the Cards on the Table

Marine General LiabilityFirst, let's define Commercial General Liability and Marine General Liability. 


Commercial General Liability Commercial General Liability policies protect business owners against claims of liability for bodily injury, property damage, and personal and advertising injury (slander and false advertising). 


Marine General Liability Marine General Liability policies are the same as General Liability policies except they are designed specifically for those who work at sea. These policies include coverage for Marine Contractors and others who work on or near water. 

Commercial General Liability does NOT cover Marine  Liability 

As you may have read in one of our previous blog posts, Marine General Liability vs. General Liability, we explained that General Liability excludes marine work. A General Liability policy doesn’t include watercraft or water sport coverage; including the ownership, maintenance, and use of watercraft owned by you, the insured. The client or shipyard/vessel may never know about these exclusions by just looking at a certificate. It’s in the policy wording- which brings up the fact that an experienced insurance broker could help you when it comes to the specifics of policy exclusions and/or benefits. 

Many Marine Contractors don’t offer their employees full coverage on liability insurance, partly because many of them do not know that Commercial General Liability doesn’t cover anything that happens on or near the water. Since their workers are not covered, this can create a substantial problem. If something were to happen to one of their workers, the contractor could be liable and not have any coverage to protect them from a lawsuit. 

Why didn’t I Know about This? 

Marine Contractors purchasing the policies want to save as much money as possible, so they often choose the cheapest policy; however, they are taking a huge risk working without the proper coverage. Without proper coverage the policy may not be worthwhile at all, so what you may be saving could end up costing your livelihood! Also, since shipyards, vessels, and ports don’t look into the coverages provided by workers on a certificate, they let them work with improper coverages, not knowing the exclusions that the contractors have in their policies. This is where the problem arises, since the shipyard is also liable and won’t be covered in the event of a loss or accident. 

Why aren’t Marine Contractors Covered?

General Liability policies generally have a cheaper cost than Marine General Liability policies because they have so many exclusions. Your underwriter (who will develop the policies you need and assesses what premium you should have to pay), should take into account your risks - more risks, such as working around water, means more coverage needed - which determines whether your premium is high or low. So having more coverage is what makes a Marine General Liability policy more expensive than just a General Liability policy. At the end of the day, you get what you pay for. 

If you have any more questions, would like further explanation, or want to change your General Liability policy to a Marine General Liability policy, please contact us here at MHG Insurance Brokers by calling 954-828-1819 or visiting mhginsurance.com. We would be happy to assist you with all of your insurance needs.  


Why do I need Marine General Liability? I have Commercial General Liability. Isn't that enough?

resume imageThe yachting industry is entering a busy season of boat shows and symposiums. Our yacht crew insurance clients, especially captains, have been chatting with us about the best ways for crew to find their perfect job. With their help we have put together the following tips on creating the perfect multi-national resume for the marine industry. Building a Resume or Curriculum Vitae (CV) can be a difficult and daunting task. A resume directly represents yourself to an employer, and many times it is a first impression. Add to that, the multi-cultural  environment of our industry and the task becomes more difficult. You should demand it be unparalleled, filled with professional experience, qualifications, strengths, and key skills catered toward the job you want. You wouldn’t go to a job interview poorly dressed and unprepared, so why treat your resume that way? Get your resume looking like it’s dressed to the nines by following these helpful tips. 

 

Absolute Musts 

There are a few things you must include when it comes to building a yacht crew resume that you may not think about. 

1. Include a photo.  

If you have ever worked in an office, you know that this is not a norm in the corporate world, but in the yachting industry, appearance is important. Your photo should signify that you are friendly and professional. If you have a uniform from your current or previous job, that would be the best option to wear. No sunglasses! Take a look at this photo of our own employee, Johanna as a good example

2. State your nationality and any visas/ work permits you carry.  

3. Note all languages you speak (don't forget your mother tongue!) 

4. State whether you are a smoker or not (and quit if you are!)  

It doesn't really pay to lie here. You will have to live and work side by side with the other crew, so eventually habits will surface.

5. Clearly define your objective.  

Make sure your objective matches the job that you are applying for. You don't want to state your objective is to become a Captain if you are applying for the job of 1st Mate. 

6. List your yachting qualifications.

If possible, include the number of nautical miles traveled. It's not necessary, but as captains scan resumes, if your number is high, it could give you a leg up on the competition. As you consider your yachting qualifications, be sure to include the size and type of boat, the time you spent at the position, the position(s) held, and the locations you covered during your time onboard. If you have any unique experiences to share, consider adding them. One good friend served as Chief Stew on a 162m. yacht in the Mediterranean. When the boat hit issues during a storm, she followed evacuation protocol ensuring the safety of all crew and guests onboard. Engineers will need to include technical information for each boat, Chefs could include any specific events or unusual situations, and so on. 

7. List your experience. 

Should you have any experience outside of the yachting community, here is where you would include it. If your experience is extensive, this is a good area to cut.

8. List your education. 

Obviously if you have maritime education, that should go first. If you have university experience, be sure to state it. If not, it can be helpful to include high school (or equivalent) experience. Be sure to clarify the type of school; we work in an international and multicultural industry and names and titles of schools or accreditations are not always clear. 

Absolute Don't

For one, it’s especially important that you don’t lie about any of your experience. The industry is small - captains communicate - and eventually they will find out. 

Structure and Layout 

When it comes to building and structuring your resume’s layout, it is important to ensure your resume is easy to read - the most important things should stand out - and easy to scan. Most captains collecting resumes at the Fort Lauderdale Yacht Symposium & Job Fair will collect a stack of resumes. To stand out and create a great first impression, make sure your resume gives an organized, clean impression. Keep the length to one page, unless you are a very experienced professional who is applying for a very experienced position, then you can use more than one page,  but no more than two! Don't overcrowd the page, make sure you list the most important elements first, and provide contact information for you that is up to date (we recommend including an email address and Skype address, but leaving a mailing address off as your resume could be kept in the boat files for a while and you may have moved on by the time they reach out to you). Don't use more than two fonts or overuse the bold or italic fonts and more than anything CHECK YOUR SPELLING. 

What else should I include? 

Include interests and hobbies. When interviewing for most jobs or careers this wouldn’t be a factor, but again, considering you spend all your time on the boat, captains or yacht owners may want to grasp what you do in your spare time. This can be especially helpful when it comes to your interview. Having something in common with your interviewers can help you to build a good rapport and let them see the ways you would be a good fit for the boat. 

No one likes a Big Ego 

The culture in the U.S. expects job prospects to act confident when building their resumes and attending interviews, whereas in Europe and other places throughout the world, the culture expects job prospects to be more humble and modest. As a result, being in an international career, try to find a middle ground between the two. A good tip to help in this aspect is to write as if you are writing your resume for someone else. For example, if you were writing a resume for a peer, you wouldn’t boast about them, you would be very direct and to the point. This also goes for any interviews or face-to-face meetings.

The Yacht Symposium & Job Fair (October 9-10, 2014) 

All of these tips and information will be incredibly valuable in preparation for the Yacht Symposium & Job Fair on October 9-10, 2014. The event will be held in the Fort Lauderdale Convention Center, where you can see me speaking from 3:30-4:00 pm on October 10th about Crew Health Insurance and the Maritime Labour Convention. 

The final word... 

Having a great resume on hand can make or break a career, no matter what the industry. When you save your resume, use a cloud document service like Google Drive or Dropbox so that you can easily share it from your cell phone no matter where in the world you are. And before you go in for any interview, always do your research, which leads to our question for you: 

Question: What was your best or worst job interview?  

The worst interview I ever conducted was one in which I asked, "Why are you a good fit for this position?" and the response was, "What is the position?"


Call MHG Insurance Brokers today at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com for help finding individual or group yacht crew health insurance plans that perfectly meet your needs!

Yacht Crew Resume Guide and Helpful Tips

Yacht Health Insurance Advise for Onboard Safety Hazards Falls don't "just happen," and people don't fall only because they get older. Many falls are linked to a person's physical condition or a medical problem. Other causes could be safety hazards onboard or in your environment. 

 

Some Risk Factors and pointers 

Scientists have linked a number of personal risk factors to falling. Here’s just a few:

  • Muscle weakness, especially in the legs. People with weak muscles are more likely to fall than are those who maintain their muscle strength, as well as their flexibility and endurance.
Are you on your feet all day? Sure you are.  Be aware of muscle weakness in your legs.  Stretch often and stay fit.

  • Blood pressure that drops when you get up from lying down or sitting. This condition -- called postural hypotension -- might result from dehydration, or certain medications.
Drink plenty of water and stay away from too much caffeine or alcohol to help prevent a fall.

  • Wearing unsafe footwear. Backless shoes and slippers, high-heeled shoes, and shoes with smooth leather soles are examples of unsafe footwear.
Sound similar to the shoes you wear? Your feet have to last your entire life. Take care of them and they’ll take care of you.

  • Sensory problems. If your senses don't work well, you will be less aware of your environment.
Do I need to say more about this? Don’t do things that impair your senses.

  • Not seeing well.  It takes a while for your eyes to adjust to see clearly when you move between darkness and light.
Certainly something you experience frequently onboard, and sunglasses are a requirement.  MHG Insurance Brokers has them if you need a pair, just give us a shout on our MHG Facebook page! Although falls can happen anywhere, well over half of all falls happen at home (onboard). Falls often happen while a person is doing normal daily activities. Some of these falls are caused by factors in the person's living environment. For instance, a slick floor or a poorly lit narrow stairway may lead to a fall.  But I’m sure you never have those conditions onboard, do you? 

Call MHG Insurance Brokers today at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com for more safety information or help finding a yacht health insurance plan that perfectly meets your needs!

Yacht Health Insurance Advice for Onboard Safety Hazards

Group Yacht Crew Insurance Plan OptionsAs a yacht captain, you have the weighty responsibility of choosing a group yacht crew insurance plan for your crew. You have taken your duty seriously, carefully comparing policies and benefits to ensure your crew has comprehensive coverage in all the countries you will be visiting; but have you thought about the subject of routine medical coverage? There is a common perception that routine medical coverage is an unnecessary additional cost; however it’s our experience that including routine medical coverage on your group plan helps to attract and retain crew as well as keep crew members healthy and happy. If you are unfamiliar with the provisions of routine medical coverage, you may be wondering whether your crewmembers truly need this benefit; perusing these 4 reasons to add routine medical coverage to your group yacht crew insurance plan options will help you make the best decision for your crew. 

  1. Regular Medical Checkups Mean Healthier Crewmembers

    Demonstrating an interest in the well-being of your crew is an important step in having a healthy & happy crew whose performance you can rely on. Annual “wellness” visits to a primary care physician or internist, which are covered under routine medical coverage, are generally recommended for all adults after the age of 18 to 20. During these regular check-ups, medical professionals can detect any number of serious medical conditions that affect seemingly healthy young adults, such as hypertension, diabetes, and more.

  2. Annual Checkups Ensure Busy Crewmembers Get the Care They Need

    Crewmembers can end up working so hard that they forget to take the time to take care of themselves. Initially minor physical concerns that are neglected by busy crewmembers who are unwilling or unable to request time off can turn into major problems if left unchecked. During the annual wellness visits that are included as part of routine medical coverage, physicians can identify crewmembers’ health problems while they are still minor, and develop treatment plans to eliminate these health issues before they can turn into serious or even life-threatening problems.

  3. ENG1 Exams Cannot Replace Routine Medical Care

    Many crewmembers think because they undergo bi-yearly ENG1 exams that there is no need to have additional examinations or screenings by a primary physician. Doctors perform a number of essential screenings during annual wellness visits that ENG1 exams do not address. These screenings, which are designed to detect serious medical conditions that can affect otherwise healthy individuals, include mole examinations, gynecological /pelvic exams, with pap smears and mammograms, and blood tests that scan for a variety of conditions, including cancer, diabetes, high cholesterol, and thyroid issues.

  4. Routine Medical Coverage is a High Value, Low Expense Addition

    Routine medical coverage is relatively inexpensive to add to a group marine crew insurance plan, especially compared to the perceived value of the benefit. Crewmembers feel appreciated and valued when you add routine medical coverage to their benefits, because the extra coverage makes them feel like their health and well-being is important to their employer.
MHG Insurance Brokers offers a wide range of yacht crew insurance plans, including international health insurance, marine crew disability coverage, and more. Our yacht crew marine insurance brokers have the experience and resources to help you select the best solution for your crews’ particular circumstances, coverage requirements, and budget. Questions about your current yacht crew insurance plan? Our team of Insurance Specialists will be out and about at the Monaco Yacht Show September 24th-27th.

Call MHG Insurance Brokers today at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com  for help finding the group yacht crew health insurance plan that perfectly meets your needs!

Group Yacht Crew Insurance Plan Options

Worst Advice About Yacht Crew InsuranceWhen you have insurance questions, it is tempting to ask friends and coworkers for their advice. You turn to these people for guidance in your personal life, so it is natural to seek their input when considering other important issues. Basing your insurance decisions solely on advice from non-professionals may not be a good idea, however, as this advice is usually based on an individual’s own experiences and anecdotes. In honor of these well-intentioned but ill-informed sources, we have decided to share with you the worst advice we’ve ever heard about yacht crew insurance – along with the real facts you can use to make informed decisions about your health insurance coverage.  


We Don’t Need Insurance Because We Are Covered By the Owner 

Not true. The yacht owner’s insurance is not your insurance. Also keep in mind that the owner’s insurance and liability does not necessarily extend coverage to you when you are off the vessel or on vacation. There may be other restrictions and limitations as well, which can create large gaps in your coverage. When you incur medical expenses, doctors and hospitals will hold you responsible for payment, not the vessel owner. Rule of thumb is, unless the owner has a separate group crew health insurance plan, it’s best to have your own individual health insurance plan. The Insurance Specialists at MHG work with several leading international and US carriers and are happy to help find the right plan that meets your coverage requirements and budget.   

Your Stateside Insurance Plan Will Cover You as We Travel 

Some crew members think that as long as they have medical insurance at home, they are fully covered wherever they roam. Actually, typical medical insurance only provides coverage while you are in your home country, leaving you unprotected for any injuries or illnesses that could occur while you’re away. MHG Insurance Brokers offer international health insurance plans designed specifically for yacht Captains and Crew. These plans typically offer worldwide coverage on and off the vessel, emergency evacuation/repatriation, winter and water sports coverage, amateur sailboat racing, maternity and dependent options, to ensure you are fully covered no matter where you go. 

You Can Wait To File A Claim 

It’s important to keep in mind that some policies have a time limit on submitting claims. While there are reasons for the limitation, the most important thing to know is that if you have a claim where you need to be reimbursed, you need to get it submitted in a timely manner. The limit can be as short as 90 days from when you received the treatment. That seems like a very easy deadline to meet, but we have seen claims coming in from two or three years ago and in some cases the insurance carriers will not allow the claim. Of course at MHG, we're here to help get a claim paid in your favor when we can. In fact, that's when it's often our time to shine! 

Don’t Claim Because You Might Lose Your Job 

Filing a health insurance claim should not endanger your job; in fact, filing a claim should have absolutely no effect on your job status, because it is your right to have proper health care and insurance while you are employed. 

Find The Cheapest Plan Because They Are All The Same

Yacht crew insurance plans vary greatly, and price should never be your only consideration. If two policies seem similar but the costs are different, look closely at the deductible, coverage, and copay amounts. A company’s service record should also be a consideration. Whether you have a question about your coverage, policy or claim, you’re looking for a company that provides prompt, friendly, personalized attention. Right now there are some new plans out there that look like Gold, for the price of Pyrite. Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Speak with an insurance broker who can help explain what you are really getting (or not) before something happens and you find yourself or your crew thinking something was covered that isn't.

As independent brokers who are constantly scanning the marketplace, we at MHG are your advocates and are here to help guide you and help keep you safe. Selecting the right insurance plan is important and should not be taken lightly. The experienced marine insurance brokers at MHG will help you sort through the terminology and key features to determine the best plan for your unique circumstances, coverage requirements, and budget. MHG Insurance Brokers offers a wide range of yacht crew insurance plans including international health insurance, US health insurance, sick pay/disability insurance, life insurance and travel insurance.  Solutions for individuals, groups and fleets are available. 

Call MHG Insurance Brokers today at +1 954 828 1819 or +44 (0) 1624 678668 or visit us online at mhginsurance.com  to find the yacht crew health insurance plan that perfectly meets your needs. 

The Worst Advice We’ve Ever Heard About Yacht Crew Insurance